<span>Sandstone crucibles from Mhlopeni, KwaZulu-Natal: evidence of precolonial brassworking</span>

Authors

  • T. Maggs Natal Museum
  • D. Miller University of Cape Town

Abstract

Several stone crucibles were recovered from an eroded area at Mhlopeni Nature Reserve near Muden, KwaZulu-Natal. Most were from the filling of a grain storage pit dating to the 17th century. The crucibles were studied to determine their function and possible technological and social significance. Glass samples removed from encrustations on these crucibles contained significant concentrations of zinc, thus confirming that they were used in brass processing. They formed part of the equipment of a local smith, engaged in remelting and casting imported brass, and possibly were buried deliberately on his death.

To cite this article: Maggs, T. & Miller, D. 1995. Sandstone crucibles from Mhlopeni, KwaZulu-Natal: evidence of precolonial brassworking. Natal Museum Journal of Humanities7: 1-16.

How to Cite

Maggs, T., & Miller, D. (2013). <span>Sandstone crucibles from Mhlopeni, KwaZulu-Natal: evidence of precolonial brassworking</span>. Southern African Humanities, 7, 1-16. Retrieved from http://sahumanities.org/ojs/index.php/SAH/article/view/135

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